Posts Tagged ‘kale’

Harvest In The City – with kale!

Eat More Kale with The World In A Garden

Join us next week to kick off our autumn workshop series  – Harvest in the City.

On Wednesday, Sept. 19.12 at 7 pm to celebrate kale with recipes, tastings, tips  &  The Book of Kale from our very own Chef Katie Lysakowski & Nutritionist, Tricia Sedgwick, at Whole Foods Market Cambie!

To find out more about our workshop series or to register, click here.

There's so many reasons to love kale - come learn why!

There’s so many reasons to love kale – come learn why!

GROW WHAT YOU LOVE

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Self seeding kale “springing” up at The World In A Garden

“Grow what you love”, said Michael Ableman of Foxglove Farm during his week long Growing for Market course that I attended with him and about 15 other farmers.

Intuitively it just made sense. And not just because it offers the sweet rewards that accompany the process of self creation but because I tend to nurture those plants that please the pallet and feed the soul.

So I grow kale.  I love kale. I have loved it since the day I began growing. It must be why I grow it well, so well that this year it is growing wild all over the garden, taking over the garlic patches, the beds freshly sewn with corn salad, nasturtiums, and squashes. It has taken over in some places but I don’t mind, it makes me rather happy to have more kale and observe the wonder of nature.

There’s a saying “Where your attention goes, the energy flows” and it would seem that this has definitely been the case in our garden.

More importantly, the simple words of wisdom, “grow what you love”,  make it clear that there is more to gardening and farming than what you might ever read on the back of a seed package or in a book. Growing is a very personal, intrinsic experience and it really sums up why I so horribly failed at growing brussel sprouts year after year…

So why kale? Kale is the most nutrient dense food per calorie than any other food. It grows year round in Vancouver which means that you can eat it fresh from the plant with the maximum nutrient count everyday of the year. It’s versatile, it produces the yummiest flowers in the spring and nutrient dense kale buds throughout it’s entirety. The fact that it is “pretty” and comes in endless varieties and colours is just a bonus.

We’re so excited about kale that we’ve launched an Eat More Kale campaign. We serve kale smoothies, chips and salads in schools, at local events and  stores. If you’re interested in eating more kale and our fun campaign, let us know we would love to get you involved!

Our next presentation will be on June 12th, 2012 from 11am – 1 pm at BC Children’s & Women’s Hospital farm market that is in partnership with Coquitlam Farmers Market.

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Winter Festival Squash

We’ve got an overflowing wheelbarrow of adorable, delicious Festival Winter Squash at the garden, waiting to welcome everyone at our Harvest Celebration this Sunday. Festival Squash look like brighter, stripier acorn squash and taste like the sweet, tender delicata squash. They’ll be for sale on Sunday, ready to come home with you and be roasted to perfection or made into creamy, warming soups!

Here’s a simple recipe from Sprouted Kitchen, a mouthwateringly beautiful blog dedicated to fresh, local food:

1 Butternut Squash …or Festival Squash!
2 tsp. Olive Oil
1/2 tsp. Fresh Ground Nutmeg
1/3 Cup Fresh Breadcrumbs / Panko
1/2 Cup Grated Parmesan Cheese
1 Minced Garlic Clove
1 Tbsp. Finely Chopped Parsley
1/4 Cup Fresh Thyme Leaves
Salt and Pepper

Oven to 400
Peel the squash (vegetable peeler works great). Slice it in half length wise and discard the seeds. Cut into 1/4” slices.
On a parchment lined baking tray, pile the squash, drizzle the olive oil and the nutmeg and toss everything to coat evenly. All should have a thin coat of oil, amount may vary based on size of the squash. Spread them out in a single layer on the baking tray. You may need to use two, too much overlap won’t yield a crunchy crust.
In a food processor (or magic bullet) pulse together the breadcrumbs, parmesan, garlic, both herbs, a few pinches of salt and a lot of fresh black pepper.
Sprinkle the topping on the squash. Bake for about 25-30 minutes until the tops are browned and the squash is cooked.

Here’s another recipe from a Seattle localvore blog (and an Ithaca food writer’s blog)- and this one has kale too!
2  Squash, halved and seeds scooped out
1 Large Garlic Clove, minced
Extra-virgin Olive Oil
1 15-oz Can White Beans, drained and rinsed
1 Bunch of Kale, chopped
1 Tablespoon Minced Sage Leaves
1/2 Cup Breadcrumbs
1/4 Cup Grated Parmesan Cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the squash halves (cut side up) on a sheet pan or in a baking dish. Drizzle the surfaces with some olive oil, and season with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Bake in the oven until the flesh is tender when pierced with a knife or fork, about 1 hour. Remove the squash halves from the oven and set aside.

Meanwhile, make your filling: heat a little extra-virgin olive oil (about 1-2 Tbsp) in a saute pan over medium heat until hot, then add the minced garlic and saute for about 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add the greens and saute until wilted. Now add your drained, rinsed white beans and continue cooking the mixture until the beans are heated through. Stir in the chopped fresh sage, season to taste with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper, and set aside to cool slightly.

Now you’ll fill the squash halves: first, preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. In a small bowl, mix together the breadcrumbs and grated parmesan cheese. When the bean and green mixture has cooled slightly, stir half of the breadcrumb mixture into it — this will help bind the filling together slightly. Divide this filling mixture between the cooked squash halves, mounding it in each.*

Sprinkle the remaining breadcrumb and cheese mixture over the top of the filled squash halves. Drizzle some olive oil over the top of each squash half. Return the pan to the oven and bake the squash halves until the topping is golden, about another 15 minutes or so (check a little bit before so the topping doesn’t burn.

Or you can always just roast them with butter and maple syrup– my favorite way to do it! Best eaten with a good book and a toasty fireplace.